The Meaning Of Fo’, Fo’, Fo’, (Fo’) To Duncan

Not since Michael Jordan’s sixth title has a superstar had so little to gain by winning an NBA championship. Dirk Nowitzki needed his ring to cement his place among the greats. Kobe Bryant wanted so desperately to tie MJ that he managed to shoot the Lakers out of this year’s playoffs. Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook long to stake their ground as the new sheriffs in the wild, wild Western Conference. And LeBron James just needs to win, and win fast.

Tim Duncan’s legacy, though, seems complete. He is a four-time champion, the best player of his generation, a top-10 all-timer and a no-discussion, first-ballot Hall-of-Famer. Jerry Sloan, long-time coach of that Karl Malone guy, called Duncan “probably the best player to ever play the position.”

If the individual accolades weren’t enough, Duncan scored David Robinson a pair of rings and turned Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker into potential Hall-of-Famers. At this point, winning a fifth championship is almost superfluous for the Big Fundamental.

But a Fo’, Fo’, Fo’, (Fo’)? The actual realization of Moses Malone’s 1983 playoffs prediction for his dominant Sixers team (who managed just a Fo’, Fi’, Fo’)? The addition of an extra Fo’? It would be the greatest run in NBA Playoffs history. It would give small-time, dusty old San Antonio (quietly the second-highest scoring team in the league) and boring, staid Timothy Theodore Duncan something they have never had, nor asked for: sex appeal.

No one would mistake Duncan for the best player on the Spurs’ roster, not for the past few years. But he is inarguably the team’s leader, and he remains a steady force in the paint, as evidenced by the 17-10-3 he has put up in San Antonio’s 10 postseason games (all wins, of course). This is Duncan’s team and will remain so until he retires.

The Fo’, Fo’, Fo’, (Fo’) and the glory that comes with, is his for the taking.

That said, he doesn’t much seem to care about his legacy—no more so than he cares about winning his next game. Duncan, the honors psychology graduate, might even suggest that a player’s legacy is little more than an intangible, third-party construct of the media and fans, a tool used to compare legends and generations and organize them just so.

And he might say that the Fo’, Fo’, Fo’, (Fo’), whatever it’s worth, is really for us. Because even knowing what we know, maybe we still feel the need for a bright, shiny ribbon to find, compare and come back to what, on the outside, we’ve decided is the bland, bank-shot packaging of Tim Duncan’s wildly successful career.

The Spurs Are Ready To Get A Little Nasty

It was expected the Western Conference Finals would be a classic battle, so it was a surprise to see the San Antonio Spurs down nine heading into the fourth quarter of Game 1 at home.

During a TV timeout late in the game, sideline microphones picked up Gregg Popovich imploring his team to, “get a little nasty.”

After his veteran team had coughed the ball up 15 times in the first half – they were third in the NBA this season and only averaged 13.5 turnovers – something seemed to click for the San Antonio Spurs in the fourth quarter. They opened the quarter on a 33-18 run and finished with a 39-27 advantage.

If that’s not nasty, I don’t know what is.

But here’s the thing: the Spurs have been nasty all season. It’s not like they flipped the switch all of a sudden during the fourth quarter of the Conference Finals. They had the best record in the Western Conference, they are currently in the midst of a 19-game winning streak, Tony Parker was an MVP candidate and Tim Duncan has found the fountain of youth in the playoffs.

Still, fans and a large contingent of the media continue to sleep on the Spurs. Why? Because they aren’t flashy. They don’t have players popping up on TMZ for indiscretions off of the court and they aren’t seen yelling on ESPN or Sportsnet after dunks.

Heck, they don’t even have players showing up in commercials hawking shoes or soft drinks.

All they do is win.

“I heard we were dead,” Duncan recently joked with a reporter.

Not dead, but “old” like your coach joked when he submitted the official reason why you were sitting out a game back in March. And, for the current twenty-something generation, old means boring.

Still, despite being on his death bed, Duncan is dragging his “old” body up and down the court while averaging 17.4 points and 9.2 rebounds in the playoffs.

The other old guy on the roster, Manu Ginobili, is rocking a solar panel on the back of his head while taking the NBA’s current sixth man of the year, James Harden, to school.

Twitter exploded during Game 1 with jokes that Harden should lend Ginobili some hair from his beard for his bald spot, but the sneaky Euro got the last laugh as he exploded for 26 points in only 34 minutes off the bench.

Plus, Ginobili was a key part of San Antonio’s surge in the fourth quarter that put the dagger into the hearts of the Thunder.

Harden, meanwhile, had a brutal game as he went 7-17 from the field.

Parker, not to be ignored, is averaging 19.0 points and 7.0 assists. His biggest contribution has been on the defensive end as he has frustrated Chris Paul and Russell Westbrook.

The heart of the Spurs, Popovich, is putting his counterpart, Scott Brooks to shame. During a pivotal stretch to start the fourth quarter, San Antonio went on a 18-5 run, yet Brooks failed to call a single timeout during that run.

Popovich was in rare form calling out his players to be more nasty, getting timeouts at key moments and maximizing matchups on the court.

It’s a shame that fans don’t appreciate the greatness of this Spurs franchise over the past decade But, as Popovich begged his team to do, the Spurs are willing to get a little nasty and gritty on the court if it helps them win a Championship. Who cares if it’s not flashy? Not the Spurs, because they are content with the shine that comes from winning, not from the media glare.

And, along the way, the Spurs are showing that even old guys can get nasty once in awhile.

The Continued Evolution Of Kawhi Leonard

Kawhi Leonard entered the 2011 NBA Draft with relatively little fanfare. A majority of the attention was directed towards Kyrie Irving, who went first overall to the Cavaliers, while Derrick Williams, Kemba Walker, Jimmer Fredette and the Morris twins were nice secondary stories.

Leonard had been projected by many to be drafted in the top 10, but he slipped to the 15th pick when the Pacers selected him. He was then traded to the Spurs for George Hill.

On the podium, minutes after his draft selection, Leonard appeared confused about the type of role he would play in Indiana until he was informed that he was traded to the Spurs.

“I had a meeting with them, and I got a great vibe from them”, Leonard said of the Spurs last June. “Just any team I’m on, I’m happy with right now. I’m just going in, trying to do whatever the coach wants me to do to make the team successful.”

On December 26, Leonard earned the trust of Gregg Popovich by scoring six points and six rebounds against the Grizzlies in 14 minutes. Since then, his playing time has steadily increased. He averaged 28.2 minutes in March, and 21.2 in April while contributing 11.1 points, 6.5 rebounds and 1.7 steals.

He is far from an offensive threat, but in true San Antonio fashion, they haven’t asked him to step outside of his comfort zone. He fits very nicely into what Popovich has done this season, but there may come a time when his stature will be a problem. Leonard is too small to bang with a traditional power forward, and if asked to score more as a power forward, he won’t be nearly as efficient.

An injury to Manu Ginobili opened up a spot in the starting lineup in early January, and Leonard has handled the promotion well. He was featured a bit more offensively as a starter, attempting more shots (8.0 compared to his previous 4.9) in eight more minutes of playing time.

This new role involved playing tougher defense, hitting a few perimeter shots and crashing the boards. Leonard grabs a higher percentage of offensive rebounds than Tim Duncan (8.4% to 7.7%), rarely turns the ball over, and has a low usage rate for someone with an above-average PER (17.0). Leonard also has the second best defensive rating among San Antonio’s starters.

In this year’s playoffs, Leonard is averaging 8.2 points and 4.2 rebounds in a reserve role for the Spurs. His impact was felt in the series against the Clippers, in which he averaged 10.6 points and 6.3 rebounds. During that series, he was often matched up against Chris Paul for defensive purposes. Paul struggled with Leonard guarding him, averaging only 8 points and 8 assists; 9.7 points less than his averages against the Grizzlies in the first round, which stood at 17.7 points.

If the evolution of Leonard continues at this current rate, he can potentially be seen as this generation’s Bruce Bowen.

Under Popovich’s leadership, Leonard is on his way to NBA stardom, and continues to validate why he was the steal of the 2011 NBA Draft with each passing game.

A Coaches Admiration For Popovich

I hope you had a chance to see the San Antonio Spurs close out the LA Clippers this weekend in Los Angeles.

I know, I know, if you are on the East coast, you could not stay up to finish it out, the game started at 10:30 and you had work the next day. But, if you missed it, you missed a clinic, once again.

Starting with their strongest link, Tim Duncan, who has shown everyone that he’s not about to hang up his grips just yet San Antonio goes ten deep.

Give the Clippers some credit though; they have added another strong NBA team to the city of Los Angeles.

As for the Spurs, they just keep on rolling winning their 18th straight game (eight straight in the playoffs). I came to a conclusion last night; Gregg Popovich has to be talked about (if he’s not already) when discussing the best NBA coaches of all-time.

I really do not like talking about the best this or the best that, but Pop’s name needs to be thrown in the conversation.

Taking over as coach of the Spurs in 1996, Popovich is the longest tenured coach in the NBA. On his watch, the Spurs have won four championships as head coach of the Spurs. Only four coaches in the history of the game have collected more rings (Phil Jackson 11, Red Auerbach 9, John Kundla 5, and Pat Riley with 5). Jackson is the only coach out of the four to have a higher regular season winning percentage than Pop. There’s a chance Pop might win his fifth ring in a couple of weeks.

Pop has a formula; a philosophy that players buy into. If you don’t like it, you can hit the exit. Matter of fact, you may not even make it into camp.

The Spurs have been known to do their homework on players due to their great staff behind the scenes. He has a special talent on how to develop role players; to get guys to play for the team, not-self.

Someone who knows about the Spurs organization once told me, “Pop is the best at dealing with people.”

As for his X’s and O’s, just watch a Spurs game; keep an eye on what they do out of a timeout (that’s a sign of a very good coach). I watched them execute a splendid play for a basket out of a timeout last night at a crucial part of the game. They do it often.

Pop has a system, it’s a process and he holds people accountable to both. His past success provides credibility and most of all, his best players allow for all of it to happen.

I recall reading a quote from Pop a few years ago that sums it all up: “I don’t want to come to practice every day and have to coach jerks.”

To conclude, the Spurs are 29-2 in their last 31 games. And not one expert picked them to win it all?

Podcast: And Then There Were Eight

Mark and McNeill jumped on the mic to break down the NBA Conference Semifinals. Some of the topics include the impact Chris Bosh’s abdominal injury will have in the Miami Heat, Kevin Garnett jumping into his Delorian, the Lakers not playing with any passion and the epic roll the Spurs find themselves on.

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Here’s the MP3 if you want to download it to listen to it on your MP3 player.